All commands, alphabetic order; letter T

This page contains the description of the commands starting with `text' (that can be used in math mode unless explicitly specified) \textacutedbl, \textascendercompwordmark, \textasciiacute, \textasciiacutex, \textasciibreve, \textasciicaron, \textasciicedilla, \textasciicircum, \textasciidieresis, \textasciigrave, \textasciimacron, \textasciitilde, \textasteriskcentered, \textbackslash, \textbaht, \textbar, \textbardbl, \textbf, \textbigcircle, \textblank, \textborn, \textbraceleft, \textbraceright, \textbrokenbar, \textbullet, \textcapitalcompwordmark, \textcelsius, \textcent, \textcentoldstyle, \textcircledP, \textcolonmonetary, \textcolor, \textcompwordmark, \textcopyleft, \textcopyright, \textcurrency, \textdagger, \textdaggerdbl, \textdblhyphen, \textdegree, \textdied, \textdiscount, \textdiv, \textdivorced, \textdollar, \textdollaroldstyle, \textdong, \textdownarrow, \texteightoldstyle, \textellipsis, \textemdash, \textendash, \textestimated, \texteuro, \textexclamdown, \textfiveoldstyle, \textfloatsep, \textflorin, \textfont, \textfouroldstyle, \textfraction, \textfractionsolidus, \textfrenchfranc, \textfont, \textgravedbl, \textgreater, \textguarani, \textheight, \textinterrobang, \textinterrobangdown, \textit, \textlangle, \textlbrackdbl, \textleaf, \textleftarrow, \textless, \textlira, \textlnot, \textlquill, \textmarried, \textmd, \textmho, \textminus, \textmu, \textmusicalnote, \textnaira, \textnineoldstyle, \textnormal, \textnospace, \textnumero, \textohm, \textonehalf, \textoneoldstyle, \textonequarter, \textonesuperior, \textopenbullet, \textordfeminine, \textordmasculine, \textparagraph, \textperiodcentered, \textpertenthousand, \textperthousand, \textpeso, \textpilcrow, \textpm, \textquestiondown, \textquotedblleft, \textquotedblright, \textquoteleft, \textquoteright, \/textquotesingle, \textquotestraightbase, \textquotestraightdblbase, \textrangle, \textrbrackdbl, \textrecipe, \textreferencemark, \textregistered, \textrightarrow, \textrm, \textrquill, \textsc, \textsection, \textservicemark, \textsevenoldstyle, \textsf, \textsixoldstyle, \textsl, \textsofthyphen, \textsterling, \textstyle, \textsubscript, \textsuperscript, \textsurd, \textthreeoldstyle, \textthreequarters, \textthreequartersemdash, \textthreesuperior, \texttildelow, \texttimes, \texttrademark, \texttt, \texttwelveudash, \texttwooldstyle, \texttwosuperior, \textunderscore, \textup, \textuparrow, \textvisiblespace, \textwidth, \textwon, \textyen, \textzerooldstyle,

and \T, \tabcolsep, \tableofchildlinks, \tableattribute, \tableofcontents, \tabskip, \tag, \tagcurve, \talloblong, \tan, \tanh, \tau, \tbinom, \@tempboxa, \@tempcnta, \@tempcntb, \@tempdima, \@tempdimb, \@tempdimc, \@tempskipa, \@tempskipb, \@temptokena, \tenrm, \@testopt, \texorpdfstring, \TeX, \text, \TextSymbolUnavailable, \TeXXeTstate, \@tfor, \tfrac, \th, \TH, \thanks, \the, \theme, \theoremsbodyfont, \theoremheaderfont, \theoremstyle, \theta, \Theta, \thickapprox, \thicklines, \thickmuskip, \thicksim, \thinlines, \thinmuskip, \thinspace, \@thirdofthree, \thismathattribute, \thispagestyle, \thr@@, \tilde, \time, \times, \tiny, \to, \toappear, \toks, \today, \toks@, \toksdef, \tolerance, \top, \topfigrule, \topfraction, \toplevelsection, \topmargin, \topmark, \topmarks, topnumber, \topsep, \topskip, totalnumber, \tprime, \tracingall, \tracingassigns, \tracingcommands, \tracinggroups, \tracingifs, \tracinglostchars, \tracingmacros, \tracingnesting, \tracingonline, \tracingoutput, \tracingpages, \tracingparagraphs, \tracingrestores, \tracingstats, \tracingscantokens, \tralics@find@config, \tralics@fnhack, \tralics@get@config, \tralics@interpret@rc, \tralics@makelabel, \tralics@pop@section, \tralics@push@section, \tralicsversion, \triangle, \triangledown, \triangleleft, \trianglelefteq, \triangleq, \triangleright, \trianglerighteq, \tt, \ttfamily, \tw@, \twocolumn \two@digits, \twoheadleftarrow, \twoheadrightarrow, \typein, \typeout, \@typeset@protect,
and environments table, table*, tabular, tabular*, tex2html_deferred, thebibliography,


\T (Tralics command)

The command \T produces a tilde under accent. Example.

\T E \T e \T I \T i \T U \T u

The translation is the list of following characters Ḛ ḛ Ḭ ḭ Ṵ ṵ

Ḛ ḛ Ḭ ḭ Ṵ ṵ

\t

Not implemented.

\tabcolsep (rigid length)

Default distance between columns in an table; not used by Tralics.

table (environment)

In LaTeX, there are two environments that produce floats, table and figure. Very often a table contains a tabular and a figure contains a graphic; for this reason, a single element is produced for a tabular in a table, or a graphic in a figure, see figure for further details. Inside a table environment, you can put a tabular. You can also put a caption. It is possible to put a label; this one is associated to the table, not the caption, so that the relative order is irrelevant. In other cases, you might confuse the post-processor.

The name of the environment can be table*, the result is the same. The environment may start with an optional argument that indicates where the float should be placed.

\begin{table}[ht]
\def\IC#1{\includegraphics[width=#1pt]{x}}
\begin{tabular}{cc}
\IC{1}&\IC{2}\\
\IC{3}&\IC{4}\\
\end{tabular}
\caption{a table with a caption}
\end{table}

Translation

<table rend='display' id-text='1' id='uid9' place='ht'>
 <head>a table with a caption</head>
 <row>
  <cell halign='center'><figure rend='inline' width='1.0pt' file='x'/></cell>
  <cell halign='center'><figure rend='inline' width='2.0pt' file='x'/></cell>
 </row>
 <row>
  <cell halign='center'><figure rend='inline' width='3.0pt' file='x'/></cell>
  <cell halign='center'><figure rend='inline' width='4.0pt' file='x'/></cell>
 </row>
</table>

\tableofcontents

Translation of \tableofcontents is <tableofcontents depth='n'/>, where n is the current value of the counter tocdepth. The first table of contents has 4 as unique ID. This means that you can add an attribute to the element before creating it. As the example below shows, you cannot use \the\XMLlastid for this element.

Some text to start a paragraph
\setcounter{tocdepth}{5}
\XMLaddatt[4]{global}{true}
\listoftables \XMLaddatt[\the\XMLlastid]{value}{lot}
\listoffigures \XMLaddatt[\the\XMLlastid]{value}{lof}
\tableofcontents \XMLaddatt[\the\XMLlastid]{value}{thetoc}
\setcounter{tocdepth}{4}
\tableofcontents \XMLaddatt[\the\XMLlastid]{value}{toc}

Translation

 
<p>Some text to start a paragraph</p>
<listoftables value='lot'/>
<listoffigures value='lof'/>
<tableofcontents depth='5' global='true'/>
<tableofcontents value='toc' depth='4'/>

\tableattribute (Tralics command)

If you say \tableattribute{color}{black}, this adds the attribute color='black' to the current table. The command can be used only in math mode; you should not use this command outside a table (or a construction like the align environment that produces a table). For an example of use, see \mathattribute.

\tabskip (rubber length)

You can say \tabskip=10pt plus 2pt minus 3pt. This explains to TeX that it should put 10pt (maybe up to 2pt more, maybe up to 3pt less) of glue between array columns. Unused by Tralics (you should use environments like quote or center instead).
See... (See scanglue for details of argument scanning).

tabular (environment)

The tabular environment can be used to create a table. Do not confuse with table (an environment in which you can put tabular environments. The translation of both these environments is <table>, so as to increase the confusion.
See... See the page on arrays.

\tag (Special Tralics command)

The \tag command is in general used to modify the printing of equations numbers; as no such number is printed by Tralics, something unusual has to be done. Adding the tag value as an attribute to the formula is not a solution since a formula may have more than one tag. We first discuss some auxiliary commands

The command \@y@tag takes one argument and adds it as value of the attribute tag of the current math formula. The command \y@tag takes one argument, and translates it with some space before. The command \@x@tag and \x@tag are similarly defined, but parenthesis are added around the argument. The commands are defined in the kernel as

\def\@x@tag#1{\formulaattribute{tag}{(#1)}}
\def\@y@tag#1{\formulaattribute{tag}{#1}}
\def\x@tag#1{\qquad\mathrm{(#1)}}
\def\y@tag#1{\qquad\mathrm{#1}}

The idea now is that \tag{foo} is the same as \x@tag{foo}. However you could say \tag{\ref{xx}$'$}, and if the label "xx" refers to equation "(3)", you expect it to be \qquad(\mathrm3'), where the prime has the usual interpretation in math mode. For this reason, dollars signs as removed. This does not always work. In fact Tralics inserts \@xtag in the case of \tag and \@ytag in the case of \tag*.

You can make \@xtag equivalent to \@x@tag and \@ytag equivalent to \@y@tag. In this case, \tag{foo} sets the attribute tag='(foo)' of the current math formula, and \tag*{$*$} sets it as tag='*' (note that the \ref wil provoke an error in this case). You can make the commands equivalent to \x@tag or \y@tag, this will typeset (foo) or *.

The command \@xtag takes one argument, say foo and pushes \x@tag{foo} to the end of the current math list. If the command is called twice, with arguments foo and bar, the result will be \x@tag{foo,bar}. The command \@ytag is similar. If you use both \@xtag and \@ytag, the result will be \y@tag (said otherwise: \tag*{a}\tag{b} is the same as \tag*{a,b}). So, the default behaviour is to merge all tags, and interpret them later one. Note that you can refine \@x@tag if you like.

The amsmath package provides three ways to customize tags. The command \tagatcurpos redefines \@xtag to be \x@tag. This means that \tag{$*$} is the same as \qquad(*). The command \tagatendofformula defines \@xtag and \x@tag as explained above (this is the default behavior). This means that \tag{$*$} is the same as \qquad(*), but pushed to the right end of the formula. The command \tagasattribute defines \@xtag as explained above, and \x@tag to be \@x@tag. This means that \tag{$*$} puts (*) on the attribute list of the formula. Example

\[ a \tag{b} c \tag{*}\]\par
\tagasattribute
\[ a \tag{b} c \tag{*}\]\par
\tagatcurpos
\[ a \tag{b} c \tag{*}\]\par

Translation

<formula type='display'>
  <math mode='display' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML'>
    <mrow>
      <mi>a</mi><mi>c</mi>
      <mspace width='2.em'/><mo>(</mo><mi>b</mi><mo>,</mo><mo>*</mo><mo>)</mo>
    </mrow>
  </math>
</formula>
<formula type='display' tag='(b,*)'>
  <math mode='display' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML'>
    <mrow><mi>a</mi><mi>c</mi></mrow>
  </math>
</formula>
<formula type='display'>
  <math mode='display' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML'>
    <mrow>
      <mi>a</mi>
      <mspace width='2.em'/><mo>(</mo><mi>b</mi><mo>)</mo>
      <mi>c</mi>
      <mspace width='2.em'/><mo>(</mo><mo>*</mo><mo>)</mo>
    </mrow>
  </math>
</formula>

\tagcurve

The \tagcurve command is defined by the curves package. See \arc.

\talloblong (math symbol)

The \talloblong command is valid only in math mode. It generates: <mo>&#x2AFF;</mo>, Unicode U+2AFF, ⫿.

\tan (math symbol)

The \tan command is valid only in math mode. Its translation is a math operator of the same name: <mo form='prefix'>tan</mo>.
See... For an example see the \log command.

\tanh (math symbol)

The \tanh command is valid only in math mode. Its translation is a math operator of the same name: <mo form='prefix'>tanh</mo>. For an example see the \log command.

\tau (math symbol)

The \tau command is valid only in math mode. It generates a Greek letter: <mi>&tau;</mi> (Unicode U+3C4, τ).

\tbinom

The \tbinom command is valid only in math mode. It could be defined as \def\tbinom{\genfrac(){0pt}1}. Said otherwise, it takes two arguments, puts them one over the other, in script style, and puts parentheses around. See \binom.

\@tempboxa (box register)

The value of \@tempboxa is an integer, a reference to a box register. If you say \settoheight\foo{bar}, LaTeX fills the box register number \@tempboxa with the second argument, and stores the height of the box in the first argument.

\@tempcnta, \@tempcntb (count register)

Count registers for temporary use.

\@tempdima, \@tempdimb, \@tempdimc (rigid length)

Length registers for temporary use.

\@tempskipa, \@tempskipb (rubber length)

Length registers for temporary use.

\@temptokena (token register)

Token register for temporary use.

\tenrm

This command defines the default font, it selects font cmr10 at 10pt (note that Tralics never looks at the current font, nor tries to open a file named cmr10).

\@testopt

Assume that \foo is a command that takes an optional argument and a mandatory one and calls another command defined like \def\fooaux[#1]#2{...}; you can say \def\foo{\@testopt\fooaux{val}} if val is the default value of the optional argument. In LaTeX, if you say \newcommand\foo[2][val]{...}, an auxiliary command is constructed; the code of \foo is context dependent (i.e., the command is robust), and if execution of the command is not delayed, \@testopt is used to provide the default value to the auxiliary command. The command \@testopt reads two arguments A and B, and checks that a bracket follows (and for this reason is not robust), if there is one, the result is A, otherwise A[{B}].

tex2html_deferred (environment from the html pk)

This is a dummy environment: its content is translated normally.

\TeX

The \TeX command translates to <TeX/>.

\texorpdfstring

The \texorpdfstring command takes two arguments, its expansion is the first one (the second one is used by pdfTeX for bookmarks).

\text

The \text command is equivalent to \mbox command in Tralics. The command is specially handled in math mode.

\textacutedbl (constant)

The \textacutedbl command translates into , the double prime character U+2033.

\textascendercompwordmark (constant)

The \textascendercompwordmark command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textasciiacute (constant)

The \textasciiacute command is equivalent to \char`^^b4, it produces the acute accent ´ (character U+B4).

\textasciiacutex (constant)

The \textasciiacutex command translates into (Unicode U+2032), the prime sign. Not valid in math mode for some strange reason.

\textasciiabreve (constant)

The \textasciibreve command translates into ˘ (Unicode U+2D8); now corrected from ̆ (Unicode U+306).

\textasciicaron (constant)

The \textasciicaron command translates into ˇ (Unicode U+2C7); now xorrected from ̌ (Unicode U+30C).

\textasciicedilla (constant)

The \textasciicedilla command produces the cedilla character ¸ (Unicode U+B8).

\textasciicircum (constant)

The \textasciicircum command translates into ⌃ (Unicode U+2303).

\textasciidieresis (constant)

The \textasciidieresis command produces the diaeresis symbol ¨ (Unicode U+A8)

\textasciigrave (constant)

The \textasciigrave command produces character ‵ (Unicode U+2035).

\textasciimacron (constant)

The \textasciimacron command produces the macron sign ¯ (Unicode U+AF).

\textasciitilde (constant)

The \textasciitilde command produces the tilde character ~ (Unicode U+7E).

\textasteriskcentered (constant)

The \textasteriskcentered command produces the character ⁎ (Unicode U+204E).

\textbackslash (constant)

The \textbackslash command generates a backslash character. This is invalid in math mode.

\textbaht (constant)

The \textbaht command translates into ฿ (Unicode character E+3F). It is the Thai currency symbol baht.

\textbar (constant)

The \textbar command generates a vertical bar |.

\textbardbl (constant)

The \textbardbl command produces a double vertical bar ‖ (Unicode U+2016).

\textbf

The \textbf command is equivalent to \bfseries except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a bold-face series (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textbigcircle (constant)

The \textbigcircle command generates a bigcircle ◯ (Unicode character U+25EF).

\textblank

The \textblank command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textborn

The \textborn command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textbraceleft (constant)

The \textraceleft command produces a left brace {.

\textbraceright (constant)

The \textbraceright command produces a right brace }.

\textbrokenbar (constant)

The \textbrokenbar command produces the broken bar sign ¦ (Unicode U+A6).

\textbullet (constant)

The \textbullet command translates into • (Unicode U+2022).

\textcapitalcompwordmark

The \textcapitalcompwordmark command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textcelsius (constant)

The \textcelsius command translates into ℃ (Unicode U+2103), the marker for Celsius degree.

\textcent (constant)

The \textcent command produces the cent sign ¢ (Unicode U+A2).

\textcentoldstyle

The \textcentoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textcircledP (constant)

The \textcircledP command translates into ℗, the `sound record copyright' sign (Unicode U+2117).

\textcolonmonetary (constant)

The \textcolonmonetary command translates into ₡ (Unicode U+20A1).

textcomp (package)

The LaTeX textcomp package defines a lot of characters, such as \textdollar. In some cases there is an associate Unicode character, in which case the command is defined in Tralics. Otherwise, the textcomp package defines commands like \textsevenoldstyle to translate into <char name='sevenoldstyle'/>.

\textcompwordmark

The \textcompwordmark command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textcopyleft

The \textcopyleft command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textcopyright (constant)

The \textcopyright command translates into a copyright character ©, Unicode U+A9.

\textcurrency (constant)

The \textcurrency command produces the currency sign ¤ (Unicode U+A4).

\textdagger (constant)

The \textdagger command translates into character †, Unicode U+2020, the dagger sign,

\textdaggerdbl (constant)

The \textdaggerdbl command translates into character ‡ (Unicode U+2021), the double dagger sign.

\textdblhyphen

The \textdblhyphen command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textdegree (constant)

The \textdegree command produces the degree character ° (Unicode character U+B0).

\textdied

The \textdied command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textdiscount

The \textdiscount command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textdiv (constant)

The \textdiv command translates into a division sign (Unicode character F7, ÷).

\textdivorced

The \textdivorced command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textdollar (constant)

The \textdollar command translates to a dollar sign ($).

\textdollaroldstyle

The \textdollaroldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textdong (constant)

The \textdong command translates into ₫ (Unicode U+20AB), the Vietnamese monetary sign.

\textdownarrow (constant)

The \textdownarrow command translates into ↓ (Unicode U+2193).

\texteightoldstyle

The \texteightoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textellipsis (constant)

The \textellipsis command translates into … (Unicode U+2026), three dots in a row.

\textemdash (constant)

The \textemdash command translates into — (Unicode U+2014).

\textendash (constant)

The \textendash command translates into – (Unicode U+2013).

\textestimated (constant)

The \textestimated command translates into ℮ (Unicode U+212E), the Estimated Symbol.

\texteuro (constant)

The \texteuro command translates into € (Unicode U+20AC), the Euro Currency sign.

\textexclamdown (constant)

The \textexclamdown command produces an inverted exclamation sign, ¡, Unicode U+A1.

\textfiveoldstyle

The \textfiveoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textfloatsep (rubber length)

Parameter defined by Tralics but not used, see \intextsep.

\textflorin (constant)

The \textflorin command translates into ƒ (Unicode U+192), the currency symbol of the Netherlands.

\textfont

You can say \textfont2=\tensy. See scanint for details of how the number after the command is scanned. It must be between 0 and 15, and corresponds to one of the 16 families of fonts. After the optional equals sign, you must give a font identifier. After that, if a character (say `*') is defined by \mathcode`*="2203, it will be considered of class 2 (binary operator), and will be typeset using character 03 of the font \tensy. In the case $*_{*_*}$ there are three different sizes, hence three different fonts that are used. These are defined by \textfont, \scriptfont and \scriptscriptfont.

Do not use this in LaTeX. In Tralics, the only thing you can do, after setting \textfont, is to ask for a value.

\textfouroldstyle

The \textfouroldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\TeXXeTstate (internal integer)

Currently ignored

\textfraction

Minimum fraction of a page (containing text and floats) that can be occupied by text. Unused by Tralics. See \intextsep.

\textfractionsolidus (constant)

The \textfractionsolidus command translates into ⁄ (Unicode U+2044), some kind of a fraction sign.

\textfrenchfranc (constant)

The \textfrenchfranc command produces ₣ (Unicode U+20A3). It is the currency symbol for the French Franc, as defined by a French law of 1987. It was never really used. It is now replaced by the Euro Sign.

\textgravedbl (constant)

The \textgravedbl command translates into ‶ (Unicode U+2036) the reversed double prime.

\textgreater (constant)

The \textgreater command translates into an greater-than sign character >.

\textguarani

The \textguarani command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textheight (rigid length)

You can say \textheight=5in, or better \setlength{\textheight}{5in}. Initial value is 576pt in Tralics (nearly 20cm).
See... (See scandimen for details of argument scanning).

\textinterrobang (constant)

The \textinterrobang command translates into ‽ (Unicode U+203D), the interrogation+question mark.

\textinterrobangdown

The \textinterrobangdown command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textit

The \textit command is equivalent to \itshape except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using an italic shape (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textlangle (constant)

The \textlangle command translates into 〈 (Unicode U+3008), the left angle bracket.

\textlbrackdbl

The \textlbrackdbl command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textleaf

The \textleaf command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textleftarrow (constant)

The \textleftarrow command produces an arrow pointing to the left ← (Unicode U+2190).

\textless (constant)

The \textless command translates into an less-than sign character <.

\textlira (constant)

The \textlira command translates into ₤ (Unicode U+20A4), the Italian monetary sign.

\textlnot (constant)

The \textlnot command produces the negation symbol ¬ (Unicode U+AC).

\textlquill (constant)

The \textlquill command translates into ⁅ (Unicode U+2045), the left square bracket with quill.

\textmarried

The \textmarried command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textmd

The \textmd command is equivalent to \mdseries except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a medium series (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textmho (constant)

The \textmho command translates into ℧ (Unicode U+2127), the inverted Ohm sign.

\textminus (constant)

The \textminus command is the same as \textemdash, it translates into — (Unicode U+2014).

\textmu (constant)

The \textmu command produces the mu character µ (Unicode U+B5). This is not a Greek letter.

\textmusicalnote (constant)

The \textmusicalnote command produces the character ♪ (Unicode U+266A).

\textnaira (constant)

The \textnaira command translates into ₦ (Unicode U+20A6), the Nigerian monetary sign.

\textnineoldstyle

The \textnineoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textnormal

The \textnormal command typesets its argument using a normal font
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textnospace

The \textnospace command translates to character U+200B; it can be used by Tralics to prevent ligatures. The character should be invisible.

\textnumero (constant)

The \textnumero command translates into № (Unicode U+2116), the numero sign.

\textohm (constant)

The \textohm command translates into Ω (Unicode U+2126), the Ohm sign.

\textonehalf (constant)

The \textonehalf command produces the Unicode character `vulgar fraction one half' that looks like ½ (Unicode U+BD).

\textoneoldstyle

The \textoneoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textonequarter (constant)

The \textonequater command produces the Unicode character `vulgar fraction one quarter' that looks like ¼ (Unicode character U+BC).

\textonesuperior (constant)

The \textonesuperior command produces the character ¹ (Unicode U+B9).

\textopenbullet (constant)

The \textoneopenbullet command produces the character ◦ (Unicode U+25E6).

\textordfeminine (constant)

The \textordfeminine command produces the feminine ordinal indicator ª (Unicode U+AA).

\textordmasculine (constant)

The \textordmasculine command produces the masculine ordinal indicator º (Unicode U+BA).

\textparagraph (constant)

The \textparagraph command produces the pilcrow character ¶ (Unicode U+B6).

\textperiodcentered (constant)

The \textperiodcentered command produces a vertically centered dot · (Unicode U+B7).

\textpertenthousand (constant)

The \textpertenthousand command translates into ‱ (Unicode U+2031), the per ten thousand sign.

\textperthousand (constant)

The \textperthousand command translates into ‰ (Unicode U+2030), the per thousand sign.

\textpeso (constant)

The \textpeso command translates into ₱ (Unicode U+20B1), the peso monetary sign.

\textpilcrow (constant)

The \textpilcrow command produces the pilcrow character ¶ (Unicode U+B6).

\textpm (constant)

The \textpm command produces the plus-minus character ± (Unicode U+B1).

\textquestiondown (constant)

The \textquestiondown command produces an inverted question sign, ¿, Unicode U+BF.

\textquotedblleft (constant)

The \textquotedblleft command produces “ (Unicode U+201C), left double quote character.

\ textquotedblright(constant)

The \textquotedblright command produces ” (Unicode U+201D), right double quote character.

\textquoteleft (constant)

The \textquoteleft command produces ‘ (Unicode U+2018), left single quote character.

\textquoteright (constant)

The \textquoteright command produces ’ (Unicode U+2019), right single quote character.

\textquotesingle (constant)

The \textquotesingle command produces a single quote ' (Unicode U+27).

\textquotestraightbase

The \textquotestraightbase command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textquotestraightdblbase

The \textquotestraightdblbase command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textrangle (constant)

The \textrangle command produces the character 〉 (Unicode U+3009), right angle bracket.

\textrbrackdbl

The \textrbrackdbl command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textrecipe (constant)

The \textrecipe command translates into ℞ (Unicode U+211E), the recipe (or `Prescription Take') sign.

\textreferencemark (constant)

The \textreferencemark command translates into ※ (Unicode U+203B), the Reference Mark.

\textregistered (constant)

The \textregistered command produces the registered sign ® (Unicode U+AE).

\textrightarrow (constant)

The \textuparrow command produces → (Unicode U+2192), an arrow pointing to the right.

\textrm

The \textrm command is equivalent to \rmfamily except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a roman family (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textrquill (constant)

The \textrquill command translates into ⁆ (Unicode U+2046), the right square bracket with quill.

\textsc

The \textsc command is equivalent to \scshape except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a caps-and-mall-caps shape (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textsection (constant)

The \textsection command produces the section sign § (Unicode U+A7).

\textservicemark (constant)

The \textservicemark command translates into ℠ (Unicode U+2120), the Service Mark sign.

\textsf

The \textsf command is equivalent to \sffamily except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a sans-serif family (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textsixoldstyle

The \textsixoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textsevenoldstyle

The \textsevenoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textsl

The \textsl command is equivalent to \slshape except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a slanted shape (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textsofthyphen

The \textsofthyhen command produces the soft hyphen symbol ­ (Unicode U+AD).

\textsterling (constant)

The \textsterling command produces the pound sign £ (Unicode U+A3).

\textstyle

The \textstyle command is valid only in math mode. It changes the current style to textstyle. It is like displaystyle (normal size) but the placement of limits on a sum or product is different. The result is something like <mstyle displaystyle="false" scriptlevel="0">...</mstyle>.
See... See \displaystyle.

\textsubscript

The \textsubscript takes an argument that will become a subscript. See example below.

\textsuperscript

The \textsuperscript takes an argument that will become a superscript. Example

1\textsuperscript{st} x\textsuperscript{ième} y\textsubscript{some text}. 
1<hi rend='sup'>st</hi> x<hi rend='sup'>ième</hi> y<hi rend='sub'>some text</hi>.

Preview: text super/subscript.

\textsurd (constant)

The \textsurd command produces √ the Unicode character U+221A (the character used for roots).

\textthreeoldstyle

The \textthreeoldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\textthreequarters (constant)

The \textthreequaters command produces the Unicode character `vulgar fraction three quarters' that looks like ¾ (Unicode U+BE).

\textthreequartersemdash (constant)

The \textthreequartersemdash command is identical to the \textemdash, it translates into — (Unicode U+2014).

\textthreesuperior (constant)

The \textthreesuperior command produces the character ³ (Unicode U+B3).

\texttildelow

The \texttildelow command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\texttimes (constant)

The \texttimes command translates into a multiplication sign (Unicode character U+D7, ×).

\texttrademark (constant)

The \texttrademark command translates into a trademark character ™ (Unicode U+2122).

\texttt

The \texttt command is equivalent to \ttfamily except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a typewriter family (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\texttwelveudash (constant)

The \texttwelveudash command is identical to the \textemdash, it translates into — (Unicode U+2014).

\texttwooldstyle

The \texttwooldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\texttwosuperior (constant)

The \texttwosuperior command produces the character ² (Unicode U+B2).

\textunderscore (constant)

The \textunderscore command produces the underscore character _ (Unicode U+5F).

\textup

The \textup command is equivalent to \upshape except that it takes an argument. It typesets its argument using a upright shape (other font parameters are unchanged).
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\textuparrow (constant)

The \textuparrow command produces ↑ (Unicode U+2191), an arrow pointing up.

\textvisiblespace (constant)

The \textvisiblespace command produces ␣ (Unicode U+2423); this command can be used to make a space visible, for instance, expansion of a \verb*+ + is this command.

\textwidth (rigid length)

You can say \textwidth=5in, or better \setlength{\textwidth}{5in}. Initial value is 427pt in Tralics (nearly 15cm).
See... (See scandimen for details of argument scanning).

\textwon (constant)

The \textwon command translates into ₩ (Unicode U+20A9), the Korea monetary sign.

\textyen (constant)

The \textyen command produces the yen symbol ¥ (Unicode U+A5).

\textzerooldstyle

The \textzerooldstyle command is not implemented (see textcomp).

\tfrac

The \tfrac command is `text style' fraction. It takes two arguments, and \tfrac#1#2 is equivalent to {\textstyle\frac{#1}{#2}}.
See... See the \frac command.

\th (constant)

This translates to þ (Unicode U+FE). This character is valid in math mode.

\TH (constant)

This translates to Þ (Unicode U+DE). This character is valid in math mode.

\the...

If foo is a counter, the \thefoo is the command that prints it.

\the

After \the you put an internal quantity. The expansion is a list of tokens of catcode 12 (except for space characters). There is an exception: \the\toks0 is a copy of the token list number 0.
See... See \showthe for details.

You can say \edef\foo{\the\catcode`\A} or \def\foo{11}, the result is the same. After \edef\foo{\the\toks0 }, \foo is a macro whose body contains a copy of the token list in the register 0 (the \edef command fully expands all tokens, with the exception of \the, and \protected macros).

\thanks

The \thanks command is an alias for \footnote (In general it is used for special notes of the title page of a document).

thebibliography (environment)

You can use the thebibliography if you do not use bibtex for producing the bibliography. The result is a <Bibliography> element (in fact, the value of the command \refname will be used). The environment takes an optional argument (ignored), a mandatory argument (ignored), and a second optional argument (ignored as well).

\theme (Raweb command)

You say \theme{Com} if your team is in the Com theme (the list of valid themes is defined by the Raweb configuration file).

\theorembodyfont

The \theorembodyfont command is used by the \newtheorem command. The default font specification is empty.

\theoremheaderfont

The \theoremheaderfont command is used by the \newtheorem command. The default font specification is \bfseries.

\theoremstyle

The \theoremstyle command is used by the \newtheorem command. The default style is plain.

\thepage

The \thepage command is not used. It is defined to be \@arabic\c@page for compatibility.

\therefore (math symbol)

The \therefore command is valid only in math mode. It generates <mo>&therefore;</mo>, Unicode U+2234, ∴.

\theta (math symbol)

The \theta command is valid only in math mode. It generates the Greek letter θ: <mi>&theta;</mi> (Unicode U+3B8, θ)

\Theta (math symbol)

The \Theta command is valid only in math mode. It generates the uppercase Greek letter Θ: <mi>&Theta;</mi> (Unicode U+398, Θ).

\thickapprox (math symbol)

The \thickapprox command is an alias for \approx. Translation is <mo>&approx;</mo> (Unicode U+2248, ≈).

\thicklines

The \thicklines command translates to <pic-thicklines>. This command is useful in the picture environment.
See... For an example, see the \qbezier command.

\thickmuskip

The \thickmuskip \medmuskip \thinmuskip are three registers that contain mu glue. They are unused by Tralics. They are defined by PlainTeX as

\thinmuskip=3mu
\medmuskip=4mu plus 2mu minus 4mu
\thickmuskip=5mu plus 5mu

Furthermore, LaTeX has \def\>{\mskip\medmuskip}. In Tralics, commands like \> use a constant dimension (i.e., the user cannot modify it, it is not a glue, and it is expressed in terms of em, not mu. In the TeXbook, Chapter 18, there a table that explains that TeX inserts a space of width X between two tokens in a math formula depending on their types; the quantity X is one of \thickmuskip, \medmuskip, or \thinmuskip.
See... See scanmuglue for details about mu glue reading.

\thicksim (math symbol)

The \thicksim command is an alias for \sim. Translation is <mo>&sim;</mo> (Unicode U+223C, ∼).

\thinlines

The \thinlines command translates to <pic-thinlines>. This command is useful in the picture environment.
See... For an example, see the \qbezier command.

\thinmuskip

The \thinmuskip command is like \thickmuskip above.

\thinspace

The\thinspace command should produce a space whose width is one sixth of an em. In Tralics, it produces a non-breaking space outside math.

\@thirdofthree

This command takes three arguments, expansion is the third.

\thismathattribute (Tralics commmand)

The effect of \thismathattribute{background}{white} is to add to the current <math> element an attribute pair background='white'. The command can be used only in math mode. For an example of use, see \mathattribute.

\thr@@

This command is made equivalent to 3, via \chardef. Use it only in cases where a number is required.

\tilde

The \tilde command puts a tilde accent over a kernel. It works only in math mode.
See... See the \acute command. (see also the \~ command).

$\tilde a,\tilde z, \tilde{a+b}$
<formula type='inline'>
 <math xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML'>
  <mrow>
   <mover accent='true'><mi>a</mi> <mo>&tilde;</mo></mover>
   <mo>,</mo>
   <mover accent='true'><mi>z</mi> <mo>&tilde;</mo></mover>
   <mo>,</mo>
   <mover accent='true'><mrow><mi>a</mi><mo>+</mo><mi>b</mi></mrow>
  <mo>&tilde;</mo></mover>
  </mrow>
 </math>
</formula>

Preview tilde accent

\time (internal integer)

\today

When you say \time=903, you put 903 in the \time counter, but nothing special happens. This counter is initially set to the numbers of minutes elapsed since midnight. So that \the\time may be translated as 555 if the time is a quarter after nine in the morning.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

In the following example, we use the calc package for converting the \time value into hours and minutes. This redefines the \today command that contains something like 2008/07/22 10:36:37.

\newcounter{hours}\newcounter{minutes}
\newcommand{\printtime}{%
   \setcounter{hours}{\time/60}%
   \setcounter{minutes}{\time-(\value{hours}*60)}
   \thehours h \theminutes min}
 \def\today{\ifcase\day\or
      1st\or 2nd\or 3rd\or 4th\or 5th\or
      6th\or 7th\or 8th\or 9th\or 10th\or
      11th\or 12th\or 13th\or 14th\or 15th\or
      16th\or 17th\or 18th\or 19th\or 20th\or
      21st\or 22nd\or 23rd\or 24th\or 25th\or
      26th\or 27th\or 28th\or 29th\or 30th\or
      31st\fi~\ifcase\month\or
      January\or February\or March\or April\or May\or June\or
      July\or August\or September\or October\or November\or
      December\fi\space \number\year}
The time is \printtime, \today.

Translation may be The time is 9h 29min, 7th&nbsp;April 2004.

\times (math symbol)

The \times command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&times;</mo> (Unicode U+D7, ×)

\tiny

The \tiny command is a command that selects a small font.
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\title

Not implemented.

titlepage

There is no titlepage environment in Tralics, but the configuration page explains how to construct a title page.

\to (constant)

The \to command is equivalent to the \rightarrow command: <mo>&rightarrow;</mo> (Unicode U+2192, →).

\toappear (Tralics command)

The command translates into à paraître or to appear depending on the current language.

\toks@

The command \toks@ is a reference to token register zero, like \toks0, except that no number is scanned (in the case of \toks0, the token that follows is expanded, for the case it were a digit)

\toks

There are N=256 token registers in TeX, much more in eTeX, and 1024 in the current version of Tralics. If you say \toks0={} you put the empty token list into token register number zero. (see scanint for details of how the number is read). If you say \the\toks0, the expansion is a copy of it. You can use \toks0 like a parameterless command. Instead of 0 any integer between 0 and N-1 can be used. If you say

\toksdef\foo 11 \def\Thefoo{\the\foo}
\def\AAA{A}
\foo={\AAA} \def\Foo{\AAA}

then there is little difference between \Thefoo and \Foo. They evaluate the same: to \AAA, hence to A. There is an exception: in the case of \edef, the result of \the\toks is not expanded. After \edef\test{\Thefoo\Foo}, the body of \test is \AAA A.

\toksdef

There are N=256 token registers in TeX, much more in eTeX, and 1024 in the current version of Tralics. You can say \toksdef\foo 11 in order to make \foo a reference to the token register number 11. Instead of 11 any integer between 0 and N-1 can be used.
See... (see scanint for details of how the number is read).

You can put the prefix \global before \toksdef.

\tolerance (internal integer)

If you say \tolerance=25, then the second pass of TeX's line breaking algorithm succeeds if no line has a badness exceeding 25. This is not used by Tralics. But \tolerance is set equal to 200.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\top (math symbol)

The \top command is valid only in math mode. It generates a miscellaneous symbol: <mi>&top;</mi> (Unicode U+22A4, ⊤).

\topfigrule

The command \topfigrule behaves like \relax, in LaTeX it can be redefine to produce a rule between a float and text that follows.

\topfraction

Maximum fraction of a page that can be occupied by floats at the top. Unused by Tralics. Defaults to .7. See \intextsep.

\toplevelsection (Tralics command)

If you say \toplevelsection{\foo}, and if \foo is a sectioning command, it is assumed to be the highest sectionning command (otherwise the command is ignored). For instance, the report class says \toplevelsection{\chapter}, this means that the translation of \chapter is div0, and \section is div1. As a consequence, \part is the same as \chapter. The default is \section. The book class has \toplevelsection{\part}.

\topmargin(rigid length)

Distance between the reference point (1inch from the border of the paper) and the top of the header.

\topmark

The \topmark command has the value that \botmark had just before the current page was boxed. Since Tralics does not box pages, the expansion of \topmark is always empty.

\topmarks

This is an extension introduced by ε-TeX; an integer is read, expansion is empty. See \splitbotmark.

topnumber (counter)

Maximum number of floats at the top of a page. Not used by Tralics. See \intextsep.

\topsep (rubber length)

A list environment is surrounded by some glue in LaTeX, the sum of \topsep, \parskip and optionally \partopsep. Nothing special is done by Tralics.

\topskip (rubber length)

You can say \topskip=10pt plus 2pt minus 3pt. This explains to TeX that it should put 10pt (maybe up to 2pt more, maybe up to 3pt less) of glue on the top of each page. Unused by Tralics (you should use environments like quote or center instead).
See... (See scanglue for details of argument scanning).

totalnumber (counter)

Maximum number of floats on a page. Not used by Tralics. See \intextsep.

\tprime (math symbol)

The \tprime command is valid only in math mode. It generates a triple prime symbol: <mi>&tprime;</mi> (Unicode U+2034, ‴).

\tracingall

This command sets \tracingmacros to 1, \tracingoutput to 1, \tracingcommands to 1, and \tracingrestores to 1. See description of these commands for their effect. Calling Tralics with the -verbose option is equivalent to putting \tracingall at the beginning of the file.

In TeX, the \tracingall command sets \tracingcommands and \tracingmacros to 2 (but in Tralics there is no difference between 1 and 2).

The variable \tracingpages is set to 1, so that TeX outputs one line in the transcript file for every legal breakpoint in the vertical list when it tries to split the text into pages; in the same fashion \tracingparagraphs is set to 1, and each legal breakpoint in the horizontal list contributes by one or more lines to the transcript file. Since Tralics does neither break paragraphs into lines nor make lines into pages, these parameter are useless.

The variable \tracinglostchars is set to one, but Tralics cannot loose characters, so that this setting is irrelevant. Both variables \showboxbreadth and \showboxdepth are set to \maxdimen: this is useless in Tralics because, for simplicity, XML elements (the equivalent of boxes) are always completely printed.

The variable \tracingonline is set to 1: this is useless in Tralics, traces are only printed in the transcript file. The \errorstopmode command is executed. This is useless in Tralics, since there is only one interaction mode (equivalent to \batchmode).

The variable \tracingstats is set to 2: this prints some statistics at the end of the run, and also whenever \shipout is called. There is no call to \shipout in Tralics, and \tracingstats is replaced by a switch: some statistics are printed, unless you call Tralics with the -silent option. Example

{
  x\bf \def\foo{bar}\foo \the\textwidth
  \skip20=2\parindent
  \begin{it} ok1\par ok2 \let\foo\relax\end{it}
}

The transcript file contains the following lines; in blue, we have indicated input lines, and in red the result (all characters gathered in buffers before conversion to XML).

[12] {
{begin-group character}
+stack: level + 2 for brace entered on line 12
[13]   x\bf \def\foo{bar}\foo \the\textwidth
{Push p 1}
Character sequence: x.
{\bf}
{font change bfseries}
{Text:x}
{\def}
{changing \foo=undefined}
{into \foo=macro:->bar}
\foo ->bar
Character sequence: bar.
{\the}
{\the \textwidth}
\the->427.0pt.
Character sequence: 427.0pt.
[14]   \skip20=2\parindent
{\skip}
+scanint for \skip->20
+scanint for \skip->2
+scandimen for \skip->0.0pt
[15]   \begin{it} ok1\par ok2 \let\foo\relax\end{it}
{scanglue 0.0pt\relax }
{reassigning \skip20=0.0pt}
{\begin}
{Text:bar427.0pt}
{\begin it}
+stack: level + 3 for environment entered on line 15
{\it}
{font change \itshape}
Character sequence:  ok1.
{\par}
{Text: ok1}
{Pop 2: document_v p_v ()_h}
{Push p 1}
Character sequence: ok2 .
{\let}
{\let \foo \relax}
{changing \foo=macro:->bar}
{into \foo = \relax}
{\end}
{Text:ok2 }
{\end it}
{\relax}
{\endgroup (for env)}
+stack: restoring \foo->bar
{font restore bfseries}
+stack: ending environment it; resuming document.
+stack: level - 3 for environment from line 15
Character sequence:  .
[16] }
{end-group character}
+stack: killing \foo
{Text:
}
{font restore }
+stack: level - 2 for brace from line 12
Character sequence:  .

\tracingassigns (internal integer)

Variable defined by ε-TeX, not used by Tralics. When \tracingassigns has a value of 1 and more, all assignments subject to TeX's grouping mechanism are traced.

\tracingcommands (internal integer)

If the value of this variable is positive (See scanint for details of argument scanning), then the transcript file will contains a trace of every primitive. Example.

{
  x\bf \tracincommands =1 
  \begin{it} ok1\par ok2 \let\a\relax\end{it}
}

The transcript file will contain the following. Note: whenever Tralics sees a character, it records it, both in a local buffer, and as object to be traced. When something else has to be printed, Tralics says: `Character sequence: all characters not yet printed.', with a period at the end, so that final spaces are visible. Moreover, when the local buffer is added to the XML tree, Tralics says `{Text:characters to add to the tree}'.

[12] {
{\begin}
{\begin it}
{\it}
{font change \itshape}
Character sequence:  ok1.
{\par}
{Text: ok1}
Character sequence: ok2 .
{\let}
{\let \a \relax}
{\end}
{Text:ok2 }
{\end it}
{\relax}
{\endgroup (for env)}
Character sequence:  .
{end-group character}

\tracinggroups (internal integer)

Variable defined by ε-TeX. When \tracinggroups has a value of 1 or more, the start and end of each save group is traced, together with the starting line and grouping level. Not implemented in Tralics, but since version 2.9, you will see line numbers when a group is started (for instance +stack: level + 2 for brace entered on line 12) or terminated (as in +stack: level - 2 for brace from line 12), in the example after \tracingall above.

\tracingifs (internal integer)

Variable defined by ε-TeX. When \tracingifs has a value of one or more, all conditionals are traced, together with the starting line and nesting level; not implemented in Tralics, but it is easy to find the \if associated to a \fi because each of them has a serial number.

\tracinglostchars (internal integer)

When you say \tracinglostchars=86 (or any positive number) TeX prints diagnostic information about characters used and not found in a font (like Missing character: There is no é in font cmr10!). Tralics does not care about fonts.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\tracingmacros (internal integer)

You can say \tracingmacros=444 (See scanint for details of argument scanning).
If the value of the variable is positive, then the transcript file will contain all calls to user defined macros (including those defined in C++). Example

{
  \def\aa#1#2.#3{\bb{#1}} \def\bb{}
  \newenvironment{foo}{start}{stop}
  \tracingmacros=1 
  \begin{foo}\aa 1234.5 \end{foo}
}

The transcript file will contain

\foo->start
\aa#1#2.#3->\bb {#1}
#1<-1
#2<-234
#3<-5
\bb->
\endfoo->stop

\tracingnesting (internal integer)

Variable defined by ε-TeX. When \tracingnesting has a value of 1 or more, unclosed conditionals are printed in the transcript file; not implemented in Tralics.

\tracingonline (internal integer)

When you say \tracingonline=87 (or any positive number) TeX prints diagnostic information on the terminal. Tralics prints these information on the transcript file only.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\tracingoutput (internal integer)

A command for controlling the trace.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

If the value of \tracingoutput is positive, then the transcript file will contains a trace of every input and output operation. Example

{
  \tracingoutput =1 
  \input{taux2}
}

The transcript file will contain

[7] \input{taux2}
++ file taux2 does not exist.
++ file taux2.tex exists.
++ Input stack ++ 1 taux2.tex
++ Opened file taux2.tex; it has 9 lines
[1] %% LaTeX2e file `taux2.tex'
[2] %% generated by the `filecontents' environment
[3] %% from source`torture' on 2006/08/15.
[4] %%
[5] % aux file  for testing tralics
[6] % this file contains nothing useful
[7] \mytypeout{in file taux2.tex}
Error signaled at line 3 of file taux2.tex:
Undefined command \mytypeout.
[8] \endinput
++ End of file taux2.tex
++ cur_file_pos restored to 0
++ Input stack -- 1 taux2.tex
[8] }

\tracingpages (internal integer)

When you say \tracingstats=84 (or any positive number) TeX prints information about its page breaking algorithm. Tralics does no page breaking.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\tracingparagraphs (internal integer)

When you say \tracingstats=85 (or any positive number) TeX prints information about its line breaking algorithm. Tralics does no line breaking.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\tracingrestores (internal integer)

If the value of this variable is positive (See scanint for details of argument scanning), then the transcript file will contains a trace of every change to the XML stack, whether something is pushed onto it or popped from it. In the example that follows, you can see the end of a paragraph, and the start of a new one. You can also see changes to the semantic nest: the end of the environment, and the end of the group. You see how commands are restored (\a is restored to its old value, named \a, the current font to \bf, then to \normalfont).

{
  x\bf \tracingrestores =1 
  \begin{it} ok1\par ok2 \let\a\relax\end{it}
}

The transcript file will contains:

+stack: level + 3 for environment
{Pop 2: document_v p_v ()_h}
{Push p 1}
+stack: restoring \a=\a
{font restore bfseries}
+stack: ending environment it; resuming document.
+stack: level - 3 for environment
+stack: restoring integer value 0 for \tracingrestores
{font restore }
+stack: level - 2 for brace

\tracingscantokens (internal integer)

Variable defined by ε-TeX. When \tracingscantokens has a value of one or more, the opening and closing of pseudo files is recorded as for any another file.

\tracingstats (internal integer)

When you say \tracingstats=86 (or any positive number) TeX prints some statistics. Tralics prints these unless you call it with the --silent option.
See... (See scanint for details of argument scanning).

\tralics@fnhack

You say \tralics@fnhack\macA\macB, where \macA and \macB are two user defined commands that take no arguments. Nothing happens if \footnote does not appear in \macA. Otherwise, only tokens before the footnote are left in \macA, and everything that follows the \footnote command is put in font of \macB

\def\macA{some text}\def\macB{foo}
\tralics@fnhack\macA\macB % This is a no-op 
\def\macA{some{\footnote{x}} text}
\tralics@fnhack\macA\macB% This is a no-op 
\def\macA{some\footnote{x} text}
\def\newA{some}\def\newB{{x} text, foo}
\tralics@fnhack\macA\macB

\ifx\macA\newA\else \error\fi
\ifx\macB\newB\else \error\fi

\tralics@find@config, \tralics@get@config (Tralics command)

Assume that the current configuration file holds a line of the form: foo_vals="A1/B1/C1//X1/x1". This is an assignment to a variable whose name is terminated by _val. In this case an association list is constructed, which can be accessed by two macros. The list associates B1 to A1, x1 to X1, it associates C1 to itself (there are no empty values). Spaces before and after the slash signs are ignored; if you reallly want initial or final spaces in keys or value, insert a backslash before them; do the same if you want a slash in a key or value. Note that the effect of foo_vals="+A2/B2" is to append the pair A2=B2 to the current value of foo. Note also that, if the list name starts with a lower case letter, then Other/Other is appended to the end.

The command \tralics@find@config takes one argument, its expansion is the association list (see example below, there is an equals sign between the key and the value, a comma between key/value pairs; the dot at the end of the line is inserted by the \show command), and \tralics@get@config takes two argument, and expands to the value associated to the key. This is a token list, formed a characters of category code 12, except for space (code 5), letter, and @ (code 11).

\edef\foo{\tralics@find@config{foo}}\show\foo
  \foo=macro: ->A1=B1,C1=C1,X1=x1,Other=Other.
\edef\foo{\tralics@get@config{foo}{A1}}\show\foo
  \foo=macro: ->B1.
\edef\foo{\tralics@get@config{foo}{C1}}\show\foo
  \foo=macro: ->C1.
\tralics@get@config{foo}{B1}
  Error signaled at line 40 of file testclass.tex:
  Illegal value 'B1' for foo
  Use one of: A1 C1 X1 Other.
\tralics@get@config{foobar}{B1}
  Error signaled at line 42 of file testclass.tex:
  Configuration file does not define foobar.

\tralics@interpret@rc

The configuration file defines lists that can be used by commands like \tralics@find@config. The list ur_vals is handled in a special way; in the example that follows, we assume that the value is ur_vals = "Paris//Sophia/Sophia Antipolis/Rennes//". Note that the old name of Research Center was Unité de Recherche (Research Unit), this explains why the prefix is sometimes ur, sometimes rc. You can notice that the key value is ignored, and there is no 'Other' element added to the list.

\tralics@get@config{ur}{Paris}
\edef\foo{\tralics@get@config{ur}{Sophia}}\show\foo
  \foo=macro: ->Sophia.
\tralics@get@config{ur}{rennes}
  Error signaled at line 263 of file teststr.tex:
  Invalid Unit Centre rennes
  Use one of: Paris Sophia Rennes.

For simplicity, let's write TIRC instead of \tralics@interpret@rc. The raweb mode offer a command \UR that indicates the location of the team. This command stores its argument somewhere and calls TIRC at the start of the document. One side effect of TIRC is to limit the range of valid research centers; outside Raweb mode, you should not use \UR, so that all RCs can be selected. For historic reasons, the argument of TIRC is a sequence of commands starting with 'UR'. A warning is issued. You can use space or comma as separators.

\setbox0=\hbox{\tralics@interpret@rc{\URParis\URSophia}}\showbox0
  You should use Lille instead of \URLille
  <UR><URParis/><URSophia/></UR>
\setbox0=\hbox{\tralics@interpret@rc{Paris Sophia}}\showbox0
  <UR><URParis/><URSophia/></UR>
\setbox0=\hbox{\tralics@interpret@rc{Lille}}\showbox0
  Error signaled at line 267 of file teststr.tex:
  Illegal localisation value: Lille
  Use one or more of: Paris Sophia Rennes.
  <UR/>

You can parameterise the translation as follows

\ChangeElementName{rclist}{RC}
\ChangeElementName{rcval}{+RC}
\setbox0=\hbox{\tralics@interpret@rc{Paris Sophia}}\showbox0
  <RC><RCParis/><RCSophia/></RC>
\ChangeElementName{rcval}{rc}
\setbox0=\hbox{\tralics@interpret@rc{Paris Sophia}}\showbox0
  <RC><rc name='Paris'/><rc name='Sophia'/></RC>

\tralics@makelabel (Tralics command)

The effect of \tralics@makelabel{foo} is the same as \edef\@currentlabel{\p@foo\thefoo}. However, the current label is stored in a character string, not in a command. If you say \tralics@makelabel*{foo}, this adds an anchor to the current XML element.

\tralics@pop@section (Tralics command)

\tralics@push@section (Tralics command)

The command \tralics@pop@section terminates the current RA section. It indicates the end of the current \paragraph, \subsection, \section etc. It terminates even \chapter and \part, although these commands are not assumed to be in the Raweb. On the other hand \tralics@push@section{mysec} start a new section. If the configuration file defines xml_rasection to foo, this given an element <foo name='mysec'>; if the empty string is given instead of foo, the result is <mysec> In any case, a label named section:mysec is defined.

\tralicsversion (Tralics command)

The \tralicsversion command returns the version number of Tralics, as a token list; each token in the list has category code 12. A construction like \edef\foo{\tralicsversion} may put `2.1' into \foo.

\triangle (math symbol)

The \triangle command is valid only in math mode. It generates a miscellaneous symbol: <mi>&triangle;</mi> (Unicode U+25B5, ▵). See description of the \ldots command.

\triangledown (math symbol)

The \triangleleft command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&triangledown;</mo> (Unicode U+25BF, ▿).

\triangleleft (math symbol)

The \triangleleft command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&triangleleft;</mo> (Unicode U+25C3, ◃). See description of the \pm command.

\trianglelefteq (math symbol)

The \trianglelefteq command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&trianglelefteq;</mo> (Unicode U+22B4, ⊴).

\triangleq (math symbol)

The \triangleq command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&triangleq;</mo> (Unicode U+225C, ≜).

\triangleright (math symbol)

The \triangleright command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&triangleright;</mo> (Unicode U+25B9, ▹). See description of the \pm command.

\trianglerighteq (math symbol)

The \trianglerighteq command is valid only in math mode. It generates a binary operator: <mo>&trianglerighteq;</mo> (Unicode U+22B5, ⊵).

\tt

The \tt command is equivalent to \normalfont\ttfamily. In other words, it selects a font of typewriter family, medium series and upright shape.
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\ttfamily

The \ttfamily command changes the family of the current font to a typewriter family.
See... For an example of fonts, see \rm.

\tw@

This command is made equivalent to 2, via \chardef. Use it only in cases where a number is required.
See... For an example, see \m@ne or \sixt@@n.

\twocolumn

This command is currently ignored.

\two@digits

The command \two@digits reads a number N. Its expansion is 0N, if N is less than ten and N otherwise. The translation of the first line is 14:03. The command is not overly robust: on the second line the space before the digit 4 is gobbled as end marker of the number N. Note that LaTeX scans the number twice, translation is 034 and 0234, while Tralics scans the number once, and translation is 034 and 234.

\day=14 \month=3 \two@digits{\the\day}:\two@digits{\the\month}.
\two@digits{3} 4 and \two@digits{2}3 4

\twoheadleftarrow (constant)

The \twoheadleftarrow command is valid only in math mode. It generates <mo>&twoheadleftarrow;</mo> (Unicode U+219E, ↞).

\twoheadrightarrow (constant)

The \twoheadrightarrow command is valid only in math mode. It generates <mo>&twoheadrightarrow;</mo> (Unicode U+21A0, ↠).

\typein

You can say \typein{foo} or \typein[\bar]{foo}. This will print the argument foo on the terminal (via \typeout) and read a token list (via \read). This token list is stored in \bar. If no optional argument is given, the list is evaluated instead. The value of \endlinechar is set to an invalid value while reading.

\typeout

The typeout command behaves like \write17. This means that the command reads a list of token, and prints it (expanded) to the transcript file and the terminal.

\@typeset@protect

The \@typeset@protectcommand is \relax; this is the value of \protect when typesetting text.


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